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Agustus, 2014

satu pagi, perjalanan dari Ende menuju Bajawa melewati Nagekeo. bisa berhenti di mana saja, untuk sarapan sederhana dengan pemandangan a la resort bintang lima.
Agustus, 2014

satu pagi, perjalanan dari Ende menuju Bajawa melewati Nagekeo. bisa berhenti di mana saja, untuk sarapan sederhana dengan pemandangan a la resort bintang lima.

planninginseattle:

Design is how it works.

planninginseattle:

Design is how it works.

(Source: designed-for-life)

Eid Mubarak!

lebaran gini, lontong opor memang ada di mana-mana. dan setiap suapannya, sering disela oleh pertanyaan-pertanyaan yang beranak pinak.  

"habis ini mau kerja di mana? sekarang umur kamu berapa sih? kerjanya jangan lama-lama lho, inget umur untuk menikah!" 

di tengah keriuhan momen acara lebaran keluarga, di tengah keriuhan suara gigitan kerupuk yang dibarengi pertanyaan om tante pakde bude, ada chat masuk di grup whatsapp, link dari Muti,

"The Hardest Part of Travelling No One Talks About".

You see the world, try new things, meet new people, fall in love, visit amazing places, learn about other cultures – then it’s all over. People always talk about leaving, but what about coming home?

We talk about the hard parts while we’re away – finding jobs, making real friends, staying safe, learning social norms, misreading people you think you can trust – but these are all parts you get through. All of these lows are erased by the complete highs you experience. The goodbyes are difficult but you know they are coming, especially when you take the final step of purchasing your plane ticket home. All of these sad goodbyes are bolstered by the reunion with your family and friends you have pictured in your head since leaving in the first place.

Then you return home, have your reunions, spend your first two weeks meeting with family and friends, catch up, tell stories, reminisce, etc. You’re Hollywood for the first few weeks back and it’s all new and exciting. And then it all just…goes away. Everyone gets used to you being home, you’re not the new shiny object anymore and the questions start coming: So do you have a job yet? What’s your plan? Are you dating anyone? How does your 401k look for retirement? (Ok, a little dramatic on my part.)

But the sad part is once you’ve done your obligatory visits for being away for a year; you’re sitting in your childhood bedroom and realize nothing has changed. You’re glad everyone is happy and healthy and yes, people have gotten new jobs, boyfriends, engagements, etc., but part of you is screaming don’t you understand how much I have changed? And I don’t mean hair, weight, dress or anything else that has to do with appearance. I mean what’s going on inside of your head. The way your dreams have changed, they way you perceive people differently, the habits you’re happy you lost, the new things that are important to you. You want everyone to recognize this and you want to share and discuss it, but there’s no way to describe the way your spirit evolves when you leave everything you know behind and force yourself to use your brain in a real capacity, not on a written test in school. You know you’re thinking differently because you experience it every second of every day inside your head, but how do you communicate that to others?

You feel angry. You feel lost. You have moments where you feel like it wasn’t worth it because nothing has changed but then you feel like it’s the only thing you’ve done that is important because it changed everything. What is the solution to this side of traveling? It’s like learning a foreign language that no one around you speaks so there is no way to communicate to them how you really feel.

This is why once you’ve traveled for the first time all you want to do is leave again. They call it the travel bug, but really it’s the effort to return to a place where you are surrounded by people who speak the same language as you. Not English or Spanish or Mandarin or Portuguese, but that language where others know what it’s like to leave, change, grow, experience, learn, then go home again and feel more lost in your hometown then you did in the most foreign place you visited.

tidak ada yang pernah membicarakannya. tidak ada yang pernah memberitau setelah ini harus ke mana. tidak ada yang pernah mengajari, sedemikian rupa,

untuk hidup, bukan sekedar ada.

satu lagi chat dari Muti setelah diskusi yang panjang,

"tapi bingung toh gapapa kan? we are young, we are immature brats who want life changing journey yet we still have loooong time to understand what life itself. it’s a given that we are confused. means we think and consider highly of our life, our future."

mkurniasari:

"The Street Life of Ho Chi Minh City"

Two years ago, me and my friends went to HCMC for our first group-travelling journey. One of the reason I found appealing about HCMC is its hectic street life. It was huddled, there are many pasar tumpah, and sometimes downright scary particularly when we tried to cross the street. But at the same time it felt homey, those vibrant crowd are so akin to many that we got here in Indonesia.

Vietnam and Indonesia are both new emerging country in terms of economy. Both countries located in South East Asia and are members of ASEAN, an up and coming sexy integrating market, and both bolstering economic growth for the past few years. But both also have citizens that fight each and everyday with blood and sweats to earn a bit more money, a bit more education, and a bit more future happiness. 

What I saw as same rush hour boisterous, chaotic, and jam-packed street in HCMC and many cities in Indonesia mirrored the fight that has to be fought by both countries’ citizens. We want some more money and we want more education to secure our future happiness. And everyday we stuck ourselves for many amount of minutes or even hours in the street. We are a crowd of everyday-life’s fighter, an army of our being, and a grass-root backbone of our countries’ emerging economic growth. 

And I sense some of camaraderie in there, those lively street life of HCMC, as I am also one of those fighters in Indonesia.

throwback! :’)

nickmiller:

whitepaperquotes:

Nick Miller, Isn’t It Pretty To Think So?

So cool. Thanks for doing this, guys.

nickmiller:

whitepaperquotes:

Nick Miller, Isn’t It Pretty To Think So?

So cool. Thanks for doing this, guys.

saya pernah reblog picture ini, years ago. dan baru hari ini enggak sengaja nemu di toko buku, “how to be an explorer of the world”. what a book with insane suggestions to do.
nggak seperti buku lainnya yang punya cerita singkat di bagian belakang cover, di situ cuma ditulis: kalo kita enggak bisa berimajinasi, mending nggak usah baca. hah ini buku apa.
saya coba membolak-balik halaman berharap bisa cari tau dengan cepat. tapi ternyata tidak ada bagian pembuka dan penutup yang bisa menjawab. akhirnya dengan pelan-pelan saya baca halaman per halaman.
di setiap chapternya, kita diminta untuk mencari sesuatu, benda-benda sederhana di sekitar kita. misalnya selama perjalanan menuju sekolah atau kantor. apa saja. batu, daun, orang, barang bekas, apa saja. lalu apa yang harus kita lakukan, berbeda-beda di setiap chapternya. baca aja sendiri :p 
tapi menurut saya ini insane. kita diminta mengumpulkan barang yang bahkan mungkin selama ini cuma kita injek di jalan, sampai akhirnya kita bakal bisa bikin exhibition, hasil dari eksplorasi kita sendiri. 
mungkin saya enggak sesanggup itu, tapi saya sedikit belajar untuk melihat sesuatu, apa saja dan sekecil apapun, dengan cara yang berbeda. dan ujung-ujungnya sepertinya this book is a kind of invitation to be just little bit more alive each day. 
satu quotenya, "the aspects of things that are most important for us are hidden because of their simplicity and familiarity (one is unable to notice something because it is always before one’s eyes)."
satu lagi, "we have become glued to our computer and television screens that we forget to explore the natural world, the original instructor on how to be curious about detail.”
ternyata bukunya enggak insane. kita yang enggak cukup waras untuk melihat hal-hal di sekitar kita sendiri ya.

saya pernah reblog picture ini, years ago. dan baru hari ini enggak sengaja nemu di toko buku, “how to be an explorer of the world”. what a book with insane suggestions to do.

nggak seperti buku lainnya yang punya cerita singkat di bagian belakang cover, di situ cuma ditulis: kalo kita enggak bisa berimajinasi, mending nggak usah baca. hah ini buku apa.

saya coba membolak-balik halaman berharap bisa cari tau dengan cepat. tapi ternyata tidak ada bagian pembuka dan penutup yang bisa menjawab. akhirnya dengan pelan-pelan saya baca halaman per halaman.

di setiap chapternya, kita diminta untuk mencari sesuatu, benda-benda sederhana di sekitar kita. misalnya selama perjalanan menuju sekolah atau kantor. apa saja. batu, daun, orang, barang bekas, apa saja. lalu apa yang harus kita lakukan, berbeda-beda di setiap chapternya. baca aja sendiri :p

tapi menurut saya ini insane. kita diminta mengumpulkan barang yang bahkan mungkin selama ini cuma kita injek di jalan, sampai akhirnya kita bakal bisa bikin exhibition, hasil dari eksplorasi kita sendiri.

mungkin saya enggak sesanggup itu, tapi saya sedikit belajar untuk melihat sesuatu, apa saja dan sekecil apapun, dengan cara yang berbeda. dan ujung-ujungnya sepertinya this book is a kind of invitation to be just little bit more alive each day. 

satu quotenya, "the aspects of things that are most important for us are hidden because of their simplicity and familiarity (one is unable to notice something because it is always before one’s eyes)."

satu lagi, "we have become glued to our computer and television screens that we forget to explore the natural world, the original instructor on how to be curious about detail.”

ternyata bukunya enggak insane. kita yang enggak cukup waras untuk melihat hal-hal di sekitar kita sendiri ya.

society

"society sukanya gitu, pertanyaan kapan ini kapan itu bikin kita jadi keburu-buru. sepertinya, beberapa hal dilakukan dengan pelan-pelan juga bisa. bukan pasrah, juga bukan alasan, tapi mungkin kita butuh banyak hal menyenangkan untuk diceritakan nanti selagi sekarang masih bisa dibuat: story worth telling,

life worth living.

just make sure, you’re gonna get there -what the society ask you to be- neither too late nor too early. and promise me, you’ll enjoy every single second while you’re on the way.

don’t be busy create a happy ending. but create a happy journey.”

-somebody. somebody inside my brain.

saya nggatau somebody yang mana, tapi sepertinya, suaranya lalu tertutup oleh banyak pikiran lainnya yang wira-wiri sana sini, sibuk mencari jawaban untuk orang-orang di luar sana,

terlalu sibuk untuk mendengar pikirannya sendiri.

Kodaline - Brand New Day

kuntawiaji:

Shame on us.

(via amaliaayuningtyas)

thisbigcity:

HANOK XXI puts a modern face on a traditional Korean building. Reimagining buildings instead of tearing them down. 

more here

nicknames: cities (part 1)

(via travelthisworld)

Imagine if a private sector entity were to deliver a fully integrated solution. They would design, build, finance, operate and maintain the bikeways, the education, promotion and enforcement – yes they’d operate the cycle proficiency training and they could even go out and book the car parked illegally on the bike path. If they succeeded and met their targets, they’d get paid. If they didn’t, they wouldn’t. Many Councils in the UK privatised traffic enforcement many years ago.

Is privatization the answer for cities looking to improve cycling infrastructure?

Rachel Smith explores this option in our latest post

(via thisbigcity)

I just got lessons about this topic in a training this week, Public Private Partnership (PPP). This action was applied to most of huge infrastructure projects such as toll road, airport, water system, and many more. But this idea, your idea, is just brilliant. The city needs a better system of transportation, the simpler the better. Innovation and creativity are required. It could become a good competition among the private sectors to make the transportation (cycling) infrastructure as cool as possible.

However, I have no idea whether Indonesia cities, such as Jakarta, will be ready to take action. But we do look forward to getting a better way to move, instead of being stuck in traffic.

(via thisbigcity)

mentariwdyst:

Lagu ini bikin saya nyaris menangis waktu nonton gig Dialog Dini Hari. Nggak terlalu tahu juga kenapa. Mungkin karena malam itu hujan turun (notabene hujan adalah kreator suasana melankolis). Mungkin karena Fajar Merah, putra Wiji Thukul, turut naik ke panggung, bernyanyi, dan suaranya luar biasa. Mungkin karena liriknya yang sangat relevan dengan kondisi sekarang.

Mungkin juga, karena sebelum menyanyikan lagu ini, Pohon Tua memberi narasi singkat:

"Kita ini berbeda-beda agama, tetapi satu iman."

Alex Turner

—Stuck On The Puzzle

I’m not the kind of fool who’s gonna sit and sing to you about stars, girl

driving on a nice day with the windows down listening to this, it still makes me high, alex. it makes sense.

(Source: a-list-playlist)